Forestry

Climate Change Finance Innovation Award Contest - Terms & Conditions

This document contains the terms and conditions for participation in the Climate Change Finance Innovation Award Contest.

Climate Change Open Data Platform

The Climate Change Open Data Platform serves as a one stop shop for data and content on climate change-, energy-, and environment-related topics. 

International Guidebook of Environmental Finance Tools (UNDP)

The International Guidebook of Environmental Finance Tools provides guidance on developing and implementing the most commonly used, widely applicable, and potentially high-impact environmental finance tools. It aims to define and analyse the primary tools that are already in use and that can be applied globally to advance sustainable development. The tools explored in the Guidebook have been successfully applied to protect the environment and promote pro-poor and predominantly rural development.

Investment & Financial Flows (I&FF) Methodology (UNDP)

Building upon the UNFCCC's global, top down analysis of the costs of climate change, UNDP commissioned a User Guidebook to support developing countries to undertake a bottom-up, national sectoral analyses of the costs of adapting to the impacts of climate change and mitigating GHG emissions. The User Guidebook, which was developed by UNDP with a group of international experts and regional centres of excellence, comprises:

Developing Financeable NAMAs: A Practitioner’s Guide (IISD)

The guide book offers a quick screen methodology to identify NAMA opportunities with potential for climate financing, and a deep screen methodology to analyze and determine the most appropriate development options to meet country-specific needs. And the process has been tailored to produce NAMA Concepts and Proposals that align with the requirements of the UNFCCC NAMA registry that will open this year. The guide walks policy makers through all the steps needed to successfully develop NAMAs and demonstrate preparedness to access available funding.  

How to Solve the Climate Negotiation Problem: It's all relative (BNEF)

In this paper BNEF presents an alternative negotiating process based on the concept of “emissions intensity” in which emission targets are related to economic activity, rather than the current paradigm of absolute emission reductions for developed countries and little obligation on developing countries. Expressed in this way, targets can be agreed for all countries, not just developed countries. They would also be more flexible and give governments more control over achieving the targets.

China’s Carbon Emission Trading: An Overview of Current Development (SEI & FORES)

China has embarked on one of the largest endeavours in climate economics ever, to establish a national carbon emission trading system by 2015. As a first step, carbon-trading pilots have been initiated in seven provinces and cities. The success or failure of those experiments will to a large extent determine the future of climate policies in China.

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